communities

The potential of grassroots sustainability movements to address a social justice agenda: a case study of the Transition Town Movement in Melbourne

Current social norms of free market economic practice and continued fossil fuel consumption are increasingly questioned as global stresses such as climate change and peak oil loom nearer. While these crises will need to be addressed from both top-down and bottom-up initiatives, grassroots movements are expected to play a growing role in tackling these complex challenges in transitioning towards a more sustainable future. 

This study investigates the capacity of a growing and promising grassroots sustainability movement, the Transition Town Movement (TTM), in addressing these crises. While these crises are inextricably both environmental and social in nature, the majority of the literature on transition towns thus far has focused only on the ability of the TTM to address environmental challenges, while the social aspects have been largely neglected. This study thus investigates the capacity of the TTM, and by extension other similar grassroots movements, to foster social justice in creating a socially inclusive state.

This research was completed by Max Ricker in October 2016, and his thesis is available from The University of Melbourne on request via here

 

Banner image: Ari Barker under Creative Commons

 

 

 

Livelihood pathways through community-scale renewable energy in West Java, Indonesia

This research identifies the characteristics of organisational leadership for sustainable development at the community level in Indonesia. It investigates how local non-governmental organisations (NGOs) engage with and mobilise communities, and what issues arise as a result of different leadership modalities interacting with larger governance systems and processes.

This research was completed by Widia Lestari in June 2017, and her thesis is available from The University of Melbourne on request via here

Building a typology of best practice Social Impact Assessment: a study of community-based agreement-making in the resource sector

This research focused on developing resource sector Social Impact Assessment (SIA) by studying leading examples of community based agreement making. The work aims to develop better practices in SIA and increase understanding of community needs prior to development, leading to a more equitable sharing of benefits.

This research was completed by Oliver Hill in June 2017, and his thesis is available from The University of Melbourne on request via here

Synergies and conflicts between social forestry and REDD+ in Indonesia; and possible political implications for forest-dependent communities

The objective of this research is to understand and identify the synergies and conflicts between social forestry and REDD+ in Indonesia. Amélie also wants to explore the complex power network of forest governance in Indonesia and assess political implications for involved forest-dependent communities.

 

Research by Amélie Uhrig as part of her Master in Environmental Sciences exchange research project between the University of Melbourne and University of Freiburg, Germany.

Banner image: CIFOR under Creative Commons